Fox Route 4

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Route 4 – Ferry Meadows to Fotheringhay

12 hours return trip – extension to trip number 3

Gunwade Lake

Up the river from the entrance to Orton Lake your journey continues beside the Ferry Meadows Country Park where you can see more lakes, including Gunwade Lake, which is used for sailing. After passing under the Nene Valley Railway bridge you arrive at Alwalton Lock.

Wansford

This trip goes through verdant countryside and some very attractive villages. By Water Newton Lock the millstream still gushes beneath the old mill buildings and a popular footpath for walkers crosses the lock. From here it is 3¾ miles to the next lock at Wansford.Before reaching the lock the Nene Valley Railway crosses the river twice more, once close to Wansford Station and the railways rolling stock sidings. You also pass Stibbington Boatyard and pass under the A1 dual carriageway just before Wansford village and the old Wansford Bridge. It is amazing to think that up until 1929 this medieval structure carried all the traffic on the country’s main route between London and the North. Beside the bridge is the old Haycock Inn and inside is displayed the story of Barnaby, his haycock and Wansford-in-England.

Nassington and Warmington

Yarwell Lock, next to Yarwell Mill and its camping and caravan site, follows before we pass the village of Nassington, set back from the main channel of the river. After yet another old mill beside Elton Lock you travel beside the woods before coming to your final lock at Warmington.

Fotheringhay

Fotheringhay is an attractive little village with a lot of history. The first castle here was built in 1100 and the second in the 14th century. In 1452 Richard III was born here and in 1587 Mary Queen of Scots was beheaded in the castle, an event that proved to be the castle’s ruin as when her son, James I, came to the throne in 1603 he had it demolished and today only a few stones and the castle mound survive. The Collegiate Church at Fotheringhay dates back to the early 15th century and is an imposing building even today following its truncation by the removal of the Choir in the reign of Henry VIII.

There are moorings above the bridge close to the village pub, The Falcon, which has a good restaurant. Alternatively there are moorings below the bridge next to the castle mound. Both sets of moorings are provided by a local farmer and there is a fee payable (see notice boards on the moorings). Fotheringhay is a delightful place that makes a fitting end to your cruise but there are still over forty miles more of Nene cruising so if you have the time the Nene still has a lot of boating to offer.

Cruising guides are available from our canal boat shop